IJCH 2015 Vol.1(2): 81-85 ISSN: 2382-6177
doi: 10.18178/ijch.2015.1.2.015

National Instability and Personal Identity Crisis in Stephen Karam’s Sons of the Prophet

Sahar Mokbel
Abstract—Sons of The Prophet, the 2012 Pulitzer Prize winner play, written by the brilliant young Lebanese-American playwright Stephen Karam, speaks of the physical and spiritual sufferings of Joseph Douaihy and his family members. Karam’s play, which stems from Khalil Gibran’s book The Prophet, traces the changes that occurred to the generations following Gibran. The family that descends from a Lebanese origin fades as each member fails to identify a fixed national and personal identity. The play ends with endless pain overwhelming the Douaihys and turning them into a disabled family.

Index Terms—Crisis, hybridity, identity, nationality, pain.

S. M. is with the English Department, Lebanese University, Lebanon (e-mail: saharmokbel@hotmail.com).

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Cite: Sahar Mokbel, "National Instability and Personal Identity Crisis in Stephen Karam’s Sons of the Prophet," International Journal of Culture and History vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 81-85, 2015.

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